Ted McCarty

by Joost Nusselder | Updated on:  May 26, 2022

Always the latest guitar gear & tricks?

Subscribe to THE newsletter for aspiring guitarists

We'll only use your email address for our newsletter and respect your privacy

hi there I love creating free content full of tips for my readers, you. I don't accept paid sponsorships, my opinion is my own, but if you find my recommendations helpful and you end up buying something you like through one of my links, I could earn a commission at no extra cost to you. Learn more

Theodore McCarty was an American businessman who worked with the Wurlitzer Company and the Gibson Guitar Corporation. In 1966, he and Gibson Vice President John Huis bought the Bigsby Electric Guitar Company. At Gibson he was involved in many guitar innovations and designs between 1950 and 1966.[1]

Ted McCarty was born on October 10, 1909 in Detroit, Michigan. He studied engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and then went to work for General Motors. In 1934 he joined the Wurlitzer Company where he worked on jukeboxes and other musical instruments.

McCarty was drafted into the army during World War II and served in Europe. After the war he returned to Wurlitzer and then in 1950 he was hired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation.

At Gibson, McCarty oversaw the development of many new guitar models including the Les Paul, the SG, and the Flying V. He also helped develop new manufacturing methods and materials such as laminated wood for guitar bodies.

McCarty retired from Gibson in 1966 but remained active in the music industry. He served on the board of directors for several companies including Fender and Guild Guitars. He also worked as a consultant for various businesses and organizations.

Ted McCarty died on April 1, 2001 at the age of 91.

I'm Joost Nusselder, the founder of Neaera and a content marketer, dad, and love trying out new equipment with guitar at the heart of my passion, and together with my team, I've been creating in-depth blog articles since 2020 to help loyal readers with recording and guitar tips.

Check me out on Youtube where I try out all of this gear:

Microphone gain vs volume Subscribe